How Can we Bring the J-blogging Community Together?

Published on February 1st, 2009.

We Love Blogging

This post has received a lot of great comments, so don’t forget to check that section when you’re done reading. Also check out this post on JapanSoc!

Tonight at eduFire there’ll be a conference for us J-bloggers hosted by Koichi from Tofugu.com. As I probably won’t be able to use video/audio this time around, I thought I should give you my thoughts on the matter in this blog post.

As of now, there are hundreds of J-bloggers out there sharing their thoughts on Japan related things on their (usually) personal blogs. This is a good thing, however, it can also be quite troublesome. We’re currently working very hard on building up a big network, and we have Twitter, JapanSoc, Otaku.fm and other social networking sites to help us doing it. However, there are still many of us who’s not quite there yet.

We need to start collaborating more, and how should we do that? – Well, I have a few thoughts on that.

  • Guest blogging
    If you’re a blogger yourself, you’re probably a bit of an information junkie, and you’ve probably seen that in other niches, guest blogging is a very common thing. I think that Japan as a blogging niche is very much ready for this, and actually it should already be a common sight, but it’s not. Guest blogging is great for both you and the blog’s author(s), if you write a post for another blog you’ll reach another audience and that will get you new, and potentially loyal visitors to your own blog. By doing this you’ll also help the network grow, in amount of users, and at the same time made it smaller, meaning that you’ve come closer to that great feeling of living in a small town where everyone knows each other.
  • Team blogging
    This is also something that isn’t very common in our niche. Team blogging itself doesn’t really bring the community together very much, but it does bring blog authors together and lets them have a closer relationship. It also lets bloggers contribute more, because most of us probably don’t run more than one personal blog (unless you’re blogging in more than one language).
  • Affiliate marketing
    There’s really not a lot of affiliate marketing going on in our niche. Many of us use J-list, YesAsia and other sites to earn ourselves some swag. But what would be a good thing is having that relationship with other bloggers. Sure that doesn’t earn you money, unless you’re actually selling something, but you’ll get new visitors and again we’re creating that small town feeling. I would happily put another blogger’s banner up in my sidebar instead of some ads from time to time, the ads can always be temporarily taken down or moved.

I could continue writing on this, but I feel like it’s getting too long, so I’ll continue on this at another time. But before I go I’d like to throw a question at you. Fans of Japan are split in two parts, those who blog or just love reading blogs, and those who take part in communities and forums. I myself is coming from the world of forums, and it really is a different world. Many of those who come from forums and the like are completely unaware of us bloggers, and that is what I want to change. But the question is, how are we going to attract them to become readers (and even bloggers) and make them a part our network, which I would call the mainstream of the Japan fandom.

I’m interested in hearing your thoughts on this, and hopefully we’ll find a solution for it!

  • http://caitlinomara.com Caitlin

    In a similar sense as guest blogging/team blogging, what about collaborative blogging? Someone proposes a topic and a team of blogs approach it in their own manner, linking to each other. It’s not always successful but with a small group of less than 5, it could work well.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Something like that actually already exists. It’s called Japan Blog Matsuri and is hosted by a blogger who chooses a topic each month. I haven’t been a part of it yet, but it seems like it has the potential to drive a lot of traffic to your site.

  • http://caitlinomara.com Caitlin

    In a similar sense as guest blogging/team blogging, what about collaborative blogging? Someone proposes a topic and a team of blogs approach it in their own manner, linking to each other. It’s not always successful but with a small group of less than 5, it could work well.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Something like that actually already exists. It’s called Japan Blog Matsuri and is hosted by a blogger who chooses a topic each month. I haven’t been a part of it yet, but it seems like it has the potential to drive a lot of traffic to your site.

  • http://kwech.com kwech

    Great article, Yonasu.

    The guest blogging possibility is interesting. How would it work? One J-blogger would invite another to come do a guest post on his/her blog? Maybe the blogger sending the invite would offer to reciprocate with a guest post in return. Very interesting. I like the sound of that.

    Of course, there are the group blogs – 7:10 to Tokyo, JapanProbe, et al.

    It is unfortunate that there does seem to be a large number of J-bloggers out there who haven’t joined the collective yet. Would be nice if they could all find out about sites like JapanSoc.

    I firmly believe that Twitter is the single greatest resource that we have at our disposal to brand and market ourselves as J-bloggers. It’s never been easier to spread our word to so many (new) people. (Your tweet is how I clicked on this post!)

    Also, for several months, I’ve felt that JapanSoc would really benefit from a proper message board / forum. I think the community there is small but vibrant, and it’s ready for a forum. So, the flow of interaction could go several ways:

    forums -> blogs

    blogs -> forums

    social bookmarking (JapanSoc, etc) -> blogs

    (etc)

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Guest posting could be done by inviting people to write as you’re saying. You could also just write an article and send it to the blog’s author and see what he/she thinks. If it’s relative and well written, the author will probably accept it. Getting a post in return is not necessary seeing as you have already contributed and you’ve already been promoted for it. But if the other blog’s author wants to do it, why not.

      I agree with you on the Twitter part. And yes, JapanSoc should definitely add a forum soon as it should attract more people.

    • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

      The JapanSoc Community Blog is a kind of forum – anyone can post about anything right from the front page (if they’ve registered), but most people think it’s just a blog, unfortunately.

      Anyway, I’ve set up a page dedicated to guest blogging requests and offers. Anything tagged with “guestblogging” will appear on it: http://blog.japansoc.com

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Well yeah, it is kind of like a forum, but it doesn’t really work and feel like a one. Longer discussions is easier to have on a forum, the Google groups are great, but something else is needed to attract other people than bloggers.

    • http://michaeldowney.net/ Mike

      I agree. The new Google Group feels more like a community ^^

  • http://kwech.com kwech

    Great article, Yonasu.

    The guest blogging possibility is interesting. How would it work? One J-blogger would invite another to come do a guest post on his/her blog? Maybe the blogger sending the invite would offer to reciprocate with a guest post in return. Very interesting. I like the sound of that.

    Of course, there are the group blogs – 7:10 to Tokyo, JapanProbe, et al.

    It is unfortunate that there does seem to be a large number of J-bloggers out there who haven’t joined the collective yet. Would be nice if they could all find out about sites like JapanSoc.

    I firmly believe that Twitter is the single greatest resource that we have at our disposal to brand and market ourselves as J-bloggers. It’s never been easier to spread our word to so many (new) people. (Your tweet is how I clicked on this post!)

    Also, for several months, I’ve felt that JapanSoc would really benefit from a proper message board / forum. I think the community there is small but vibrant, and it’s ready for a forum. So, the flow of interaction could go several ways:

    forums -> blogs

    blogs -> forums

    social bookmarking (JapanSoc, etc) -> blogs

    (etc)

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Guest posting could be done by inviting people to write as you’re saying. You could also just write an article and send it to the blog’s author and see what he/she thinks. If it’s relative and well written, the author will probably accept it. Getting a post in return is not necessary seeing as you have already contributed and you’ve already been promoted for it. But if the other blog’s author wants to do it, why not.

      I agree with you on the Twitter part. And yes, JapanSoc should definitely add a forum soon as it should attract more people.

    • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

      The JapanSoc Community Blog is a kind of forum – anyone can post about anything right from the front page (if they’ve registered), but most people think it’s just a blog, unfortunately.

      Anyway, I’ve set up a page dedicated to guest blogging requests and offers. Anything tagged with “guestblogging” will appear on it: http://blog.japansoc.com

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Well yeah, it is kind of like a forum, but it doesn’t really work and feel like a one. Longer discussions is easier to have on a forum, the Google groups are great, but something else is needed to attract other people than bloggers.

    • http://michaeldowney.net/ Mike

      I agree. The new Google Group feels more like a community ^^

  • roy

    Yonasu, I get what you say but really? Bloggers getting together for what? Its really to increase traffic so they can monetize. You think Danny Choo and Japanprobe allow guest posts or user generated content because it’s nice for others? No its about getting free content from other people to MAKE MONEY. Personally, I like blogs like Tokyo Times, Tokyo Mango, Japansugoi and yours much more

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Well, sure monetizing is a part of it. But it’s really a win win situation. Sure, Danny Choo most definitely wouldn’t accept a guest post, but I could see Japan Probe doing it.

      The J-blogger conference ended a little while ago, and pretty much everyone is very interested in guest blogging. You don’t allow guest posts because it’s nice for others, you do it because you’ll get more traffic.

      Now, guest blogging can be a bit excessive. While I would accept a well written and relative guest post, targeting personal blogs would be a little weird. You’re probably better off posting the article on your own blog instead and asking other blog authors to promote it.

      Thanks for liking my blog :) Oh and if this doesn’t make any sense it’s because I’m writing this REALLY late, so sorry if that’s the case, haha.

  • roy

    Yonasu, I get what you say but really? Bloggers getting together for what? Its really to increase traffic so they can monetize. You think Danny Choo and Japanprobe allow guest posts or user generated content because it’s nice for others? No its about getting free content from other people to MAKE MONEY. Personally, I like blogs like Tokyo Times, Tokyo Mango, Japansugoi and yours much more

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Well, sure monetizing is a part of it. But it’s really a win win situation. Sure, Danny Choo most definitely wouldn’t accept a guest post, but I could see Japan Probe doing it.

      The J-blogger conference ended a little while ago, and pretty much everyone is very interested in guest blogging. You don’t allow guest posts because it’s nice for others, you do it because you’ll get more traffic.

      Now, guest blogging can be a bit excessive. While I would accept a well written and relative guest post, targeting personal blogs would be a little weird. You’re probably better off posting the article on your own blog instead and asking other blog authors to promote it.

      Thanks for liking my blog :) Oh and if this doesn’t make any sense it’s because I’m writing this REALLY late, so sorry if that’s the case, haha.

  • http://www.pleasureprincipled.com/ Ray Mescallado

    Your post intrigued me, mostly because I’d been trying to build a community among bloggers of Japanese music and idols for over three years now. It started out with weekly blog roundups in July 2005. Next was a feed aggregate for J-bloggers – Feed of Pop, now dead – which then became International Wota, which is actually linked here on your blogroll. IW is about to celebrate two years of existence and currently covers about 200 blogs; within the core of the IW group, there’s a good deal of guest blogging as well as group blogs and even hosting of other bloggers by those who own domains. There’ve even been recent attempts at collaborative blogging, a separate community for Jrock reviews, and some of us use Twitter to promote new posts. In the past year, I’ve left IW in very capable hands and just this month started a new site where I pay bloggers to write articles. I’m not sure how long this experiment will last, but the results have already been personally satisfying.

    None of this is about making money – there’s no ads on IW or my new site, and I once refused an offer to monetize IW. The community is simply sharing a particular interest with like-minded people and trying to encourage good writing about that interest. It’s clear that all the J-bloggers out there aren’t being covered – and sticking primarily to music blogs certainly creates limits – but the IW community’s doing the best we can and are always welcoming new folks to the fold.

    If the interest is there, it could work to everyone’s favor if the different organizing groups out there began looking at where their coverages overlap and where they’re different, and see if some further interaction can take place. I have no idea where this would lead, but as you said, the point is to attract more readers and encourage new bloggers, and any such collaboration could only lead to that.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Thanks for your good reply! What you’ve been doing is great, especially with IW. More sites like IW for other Japanese things would be great, like Japanese photography, dramas and whatnot.

      I’m guessing that new site is Pleasure Principled? I have yet to read the articles, but just by looking at them I can tell that it’s good stuff.

      Your last thing there is really inspiring, it’s something that could very well be done, someone has to get things started though.

  • http://www.pleasureprincipled.com/ Ray Mescallado

    Your post intrigued me, mostly because I’d been trying to build a community among bloggers of Japanese music and idols for over three years now. It started out with weekly blog roundups in July 2005. Next was a feed aggregate for J-bloggers – Feed of Pop, now dead – which then became International Wota, which is actually linked here on your blogroll. IW is about to celebrate two years of existence and currently covers about 200 blogs; within the core of the IW group, there’s a good deal of guest blogging as well as group blogs and even hosting of other bloggers by those who own domains. There’ve even been recent attempts at collaborative blogging, a separate community for Jrock reviews, and some of us use Twitter to promote new posts. In the past year, I’ve left IW in very capable hands and just this month started a new site where I pay bloggers to write articles. I’m not sure how long this experiment will last, but the results have already been personally satisfying.

    None of this is about making money – there’s no ads on IW or my new site, and I once refused an offer to monetize IW. The community is simply sharing a particular interest with like-minded people and trying to encourage good writing about that interest. It’s clear that all the J-bloggers out there aren’t being covered – and sticking primarily to music blogs certainly creates limits – but the IW community’s doing the best we can and are always welcoming new folks to the fold.

    If the interest is there, it could work to everyone’s favor if the different organizing groups out there began looking at where their coverages overlap and where they’re different, and see if some further interaction can take place. I have no idea where this would lead, but as you said, the point is to attract more readers and encourage new bloggers, and any such collaboration could only lead to that.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Thanks for your good reply! What you’ve been doing is great, especially with IW. More sites like IW for other Japanese things would be great, like Japanese photography, dramas and whatnot.

      I’m guessing that new site is Pleasure Principled? I have yet to read the articles, but just by looking at them I can tell that it’s good stuff.

      Your last thing there is really inspiring, it’s something that could very well be done, someone has to get things started though.

  • http://dshack.net David

    I really like the idea of a feed aggregator, especially if we could tag authors, add profiles, and give people the option to only aggregate their excerpts, so monetizers don’t lose out. Imagine going to a site and being able to get a giant feed of all the Japan news blogs, or all the exchange student blogs, or all the Japanese learning blogs. Submission-based stuff like JapanSoc is great, but automatic aggregation would be even cooler, especially if we could add twitter and flickr streams in there, too. I just started spring break, and I think I’m going to work on a prototype exchange student portal. Anyone wants to help, drop me a line.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      I like the idea of that, kind of like what http://www.design-feed.net does for that part of the blogosphere. Something similar is being done with twitter.com/JapanList where you can find Japan related people to follow.

    • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

      David, you do know about this right? http://blog.japansoc.com/latest/ It’s an aggregated feed of nearly 100 Japan blogs.

  • http://dshack.net David

    I really like the idea of a feed aggregator, especially if we could tag authors, add profiles, and give people the option to only aggregate their excerpts, so monetizers don’t lose out. Imagine going to a site and being able to get a giant feed of all the Japan news blogs, or all the exchange student blogs, or all the Japanese learning blogs. Submission-based stuff like JapanSoc is great, but automatic aggregation would be even cooler, especially if we could add twitter and flickr streams in there, too. I just started spring break, and I think I’m going to work on a prototype exchange student portal. Anyone wants to help, drop me a line.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      I like the idea of that, kind of like what http://www.design-feed.net does for that part of the blogosphere. Something similar is being done with twitter.com/JapanList where you can find Japan related people to follow.

    • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

      David, you do know about this right? http://blog.japansoc.com/latest/ It’s an aggregated feed of nearly 100 Japan blogs.

  • http://kantanda.wordpress.com/ Mizuu

    Great idea, Yonasu-san,

    I’m also a part of the JBlogosphere but… I blog in Polish. I once considered writing a blog in English, but my main focus is glottodidactics and the art of teaching and learning Japanese is still an uncrowded niche in my language. Hence, I wanted to help Poles who do not speak English or Russian (vast areas of cyberspace on Japanese language are in those languages) to continue their adventure with Japanese. I’ve already got much help from people like Koichi-san over at Tofugu.com or TaeKim-san, both letting me to translate one or two interesting notes I’ve picked from their blogs.

    Either way, as Polish J-blogging community is not that big, we’re fairly close with each other. Now, I suppose branching out should take place, but I have only a hazy idea of what use we can be to international bloggers. People like Mazzi ( http://mazzi.wordpress.com/ ) or Lort ( http://www.drunk-otaku-inn.yoyo.pl/ he does a zine on Popculture) would be more than interested with some projects.

    Not for the money. We can earn our living. For the sake of fun and meeting new people.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      That’s good, I’ve been thinking about starting up another blog in Swedish actually. But I really have no experience of blogging in Swedish so that’s something I have to think about.

      I’d be interested in hearing more of your ideas about working with international bloggers, I haven’t really given it much thought.

  • http://kantanda.wordpress.com/ Mizuu

    Great idea, Yonasu-san,

    I’m also a part of the JBlogosphere but… I blog in Polish. I once considered writing a blog in English, but my main focus is glottodidactics and the art of teaching and learning Japanese is still an uncrowded niche in my language. Hence, I wanted to help Poles who do not speak English or Russian (vast areas of cyberspace on Japanese language are in those languages) to continue their adventure with Japanese. I’ve already got much help from people like Koichi-san over at Tofugu.com or TaeKim-san, both letting me to translate one or two interesting notes I’ve picked from their blogs.

    Either way, as Polish J-blogging community is not that big, we’re fairly close with each other. Now, I suppose branching out should take place, but I have only a hazy idea of what use we can be to international bloggers. People like Mazzi ( http://mazzi.wordpress.com/ ) or Lort ( http://www.drunk-otaku-inn.yoyo.pl/ he does a zine on Popculture) would be more than interested with some projects.

    Not for the money. We can earn our living. For the sake of fun and meeting new people.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      That’s good, I’ve been thinking about starting up another blog in Swedish actually. But I really have no experience of blogging in Swedish so that’s something I have to think about.

      I’d be interested in hearing more of your ideas about working with international bloggers, I haven’t really given it much thought.

  • http://news.3yen.com/ Taro 3Yen.com

    She-e-e-it.
    Just find something interesting to say about always wonky Japan and the let the rest-of-world blog about it, sheesh.

  • http://news.3yen.com/ Taro 3Yen.com

    She-e-e-it.
    Just find something interesting to say about always wonky Japan and the let the rest-of-world blog about it, sheesh.

  • http://www.loneleeplanet.com reesan

    Good post, Yonasu. Collaboration is great, in my view.

    Embryonic blogs get air time that they would not normally get and if the blog style is appealing then there is more opportunity for it to be discovered. This means that the consumer of blog posts, the readers, are presented with more variety.

    I guess however, there would be an obvious (and understandable) lack of motivation from established bloggers and monetizers to participate in a collaboration as they have already done the hard yards to establish their following.

    Maybe it is fair market for these guys to sell ‘guest blogger’ real estate on their site?

  • http://www.loneleeplanet.com reesan

    Good post, Yonasu. Collaboration is great, in my view.

    Embryonic blogs get air time that they would not normally get and if the blog style is appealing then there is more opportunity for it to be discovered. This means that the consumer of blog posts, the readers, are presented with more variety.

    I guess however, there would be an obvious (and understandable) lack of motivation from established bloggers and monetizers to participate in a collaboration as they have already done the hard yards to establish their following.

    Maybe it is fair market for these guys to sell ‘guest blogger’ real estate on their site?

  • http://takeme2japan.wordpress.com/ João Paulo Rosman

    I just started blogging about Japan,but I’ve been a jblog reader for quite some time, and see some kind of unity between the authors.
    I would love if there was some kind of club for Jbloggers – actually people who write about Japan and japanese culture, this club could be something like Orkut our Linked in, but you only for J-writers.
    The thing is i should be in 3 languages English because is the most popular language, Japanese (we are talking about Japan) and Portuguese, Brazil has the largest japanese community outside of Japan.
    The club should also make meetings and discussion and share material for post and blogs and create a real social network of common interests

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      We’re already working on it, although only for bloggers using English and Japanese. We’re having meetings through eduFire and working together in a newly started group on Google. A lot of things are going to happen soon to the J-blogging community :)

  • http://takeme2japan.wordpress.com/ João Paulo Rosman

    I just started blogging about Japan,but I’ve been a jblog reader for quite some time, and see some kind of unity between the authors.
    I would love if there was some kind of club for Jbloggers – actually people who write about Japan and japanese culture, this club could be something like Orkut our Linked in, but you only for J-writers.
    The thing is i should be in 3 languages English because is the most popular language, Japanese (we are talking about Japan) and Portuguese, Brazil has the largest japanese community outside of Japan.
    The club should also make meetings and discussion and share material for post and blogs and create a real social network of common interests

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      We’re already working on it, although only for bloggers using English and Japanese. We’re having meetings through eduFire and working together in a newly started group on Google. A lot of things are going to happen soon to the J-blogging community :)

  • http://theghostletters.blogspot.com/ freedomwv

    All of those are good ideas. It is good to see that people are trying to make J-blogging bigger and better for everyone.

  • http://theghostletters.blogspot.com/ freedomwv

    All of those are good ideas. It is good to see that people are trying to make J-blogging bigger and better for everyone.

  • http://www.seoul-man.blogspot.com Jon Allen

    Hi Yonasu.
    I just found your blog from a link via on Neil Duckett’s blog to your J-Babe photos.

    I started blogging when I was living in South Korea. It’s interesting how the K-Bloggers are more tight knit community. One reason is that I think there are probably a lot less bloggers than in Japan.

    One website that certainly helped keep track of new Korean blogs is the http://www.koreanbloglist.com/ run by Alan Scully.

    By coincidence he now lives in Tokyo, but he still maintains the list.

    There is website with a list of J-Blogs somewhere, but I’m not sure if it’s still maintained. I wonder if a well supported list of J-Blogs would be a good start?

    I would check out the aggregator you mention, but I don’t want to get into twitter. To be honest I spend far too long on the PC and joining twitter would just increase that time.

    It’s about time I updated my blogroll, so you’ll be added next.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      I see, thanks for visiting!

      A list of Japan blogs would be too long, so there’s really no point in having it. Well, unless someone actually takes the time and make it really good with descriptions of every site. http://www.japanbloglist.com still exists, but I don’t think a lot of J-bloggers add their blogs there, don’t even know if it’s being maintained anymore.

    • http://www.seoul-man.blogspot.com Jon Allen

      yeah, that’s the one.

      Another idea is a Best of J-blogs competition. Hub of sparkle just did one for K-blogs :

      http://www.koreasparkle.com/2009/02/the-golden-klogs-results-are-in/#content

  • http://www.seoul-man.blogspot.com Jon Allen

    Hi Yonasu.
    I just found your blog from a link via on Neil Duckett’s blog to your J-Babe photos.

    I started blogging when I was living in South Korea. It’s interesting how the K-Bloggers are more tight knit community. One reason is that I think there are probably a lot less bloggers than in Japan.

    One website that certainly helped keep track of new Korean blogs is the http://www.koreanbloglist.com/ run by Alan Scully.

    By coincidence he now lives in Tokyo, but he still maintains the list.

    There is website with a list of J-Blogs somewhere, but I’m not sure if it’s still maintained. I wonder if a well supported list of J-Blogs would be a good start?

    I would check out the aggregator you mention, but I don’t want to get into twitter. To be honest I spend far too long on the PC and joining twitter would just increase that time.

    It’s about time I updated my blogroll, so you’ll be added next.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      I see, thanks for visiting!

      A list of Japan blogs would be too long, so there’s really no point in having it. Well, unless someone actually takes the time and make it really good with descriptions of every site. http://www.japanbloglist.com still exists, but I don’t think a lot of J-bloggers add their blogs there, don’t even know if it’s being maintained anymore.

    • http://www.seoul-man.blogspot.com Jon Allen

      yeah, that’s the one.

      Another idea is a Best of J-blogs competition. Hub of sparkle just did one for K-blogs :

      http://www.koreasparkle.com/2009/02/the-golden-klogs-results-are-in/#content

  • http://sevententotokyo.com billywest

    As far as collaboration goes, after having tried and not having done so well, I see the group blog thing only working if several blog authors contribute consistently to keep the overall blog content fresh and the workload for each member to a minimum. Unfortunately, if monetization becomes an issue, splitting the income can become a source of frustration.
    And, of course, all the collaboration in the world isn’t going to help if most of the group blog’s content is the same tired old stuff other Japan bloggers have posted about or just isn’t very interesting in general.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Yeah, that’s a problem for team blogs. You have to set up some rules. Splitting the income evenly among writers wouldn’t work, you’d probably have to go by the pageviews of posts or something like that if you want to monetize it.

      The good thing with team blogs it that you don’t have to post as often, and that means you have time to actually write something really good. But yeah, as you said, it’s hard to keep it running unless everyone contribute consistently.

      You most definitely have more experience on this though since I’ve never actually been a part of a team blog.

  • http://sevententotokyo.com billywest

    As far as collaboration goes, after having tried and not having done so well, I see the group blog thing only working if several blog authors contribute consistently to keep the overall blog content fresh and the workload for each member to a minimum. Unfortunately, if monetization becomes an issue, splitting the income can become a source of frustration.
    And, of course, all the collaboration in the world isn’t going to help if most of the group blog’s content is the same tired old stuff other Japan bloggers have posted about or just isn’t very interesting in general.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      Yeah, that’s a problem for team blogs. You have to set up some rules. Splitting the income evenly among writers wouldn’t work, you’d probably have to go by the pageviews of posts or something like that if you want to monetize it.

      The good thing with team blogs it that you don’t have to post as often, and that means you have time to actually write something really good. But yeah, as you said, it’s hard to keep it running unless everyone contribute consistently.

      You most definitely have more experience on this though since I’ve never actually been a part of a team blog.

  • kuroshirohaiiro

    as an avid blog reader i have been experimenting on ways to start blogging

    i only have a certain animosity toward j-blogging because in reality i would have no idea what i am doing…e-mail me back with some suggestions?

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      I have sent you an email, please continue the conversation there.

  • kuroshirohaiiro

    as an avid blog reader i have been experimenting on ways to start blogging

    i only have a certain animosity toward j-blogging because in reality i would have no idea what i am doing…e-mail me back with some suggestions?

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      I have sent you an email, please continue the conversation there.

  • http://japanite.com Japanite

    It’s a great thought, but maybe I’m not understanding you completely. What is the purpose of creating such a community? I think that communities or one-on-one co-operation are done independently by the bloggers. I can’t think on a way to “organize” it. What I do know (and if they are any Jbloggers here that don’t know that) is that Jbloggers are among the most nice people I’ve met. And if anyone want to do a guest post or some marketing together, then any one he’ll choose will do his best to help him.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      The main purpose is probably because it’s fun and we get a closer connection to each other. By doing so, it’s easier to collaborate and work together. When it comes to guest blogging it would still be done one-on-one, but there are many other things that we can all work on together. If you’re not a part of the Google group we have set up, let me know and I’ll send you an invite (that goes for every blogger who’s reading this).

  • http://japanite.com Japanite

    It’s a great thought, but maybe I’m not understanding you completely. What is the purpose of creating such a community? I think that communities or one-on-one co-operation are done independently by the bloggers. I can’t think on a way to “organize” it. What I do know (and if they are any Jbloggers here that don’t know that) is that Jbloggers are among the most nice people I’ve met. And if anyone want to do a guest post or some marketing together, then any one he’ll choose will do his best to help him.

    • http://www.yonasu.com yonasu

      The main purpose is probably because it’s fun and we get a closer connection to each other. By doing so, it’s easier to collaborate and work together. When it comes to guest blogging it would still be done one-on-one, but there are many other things that we can all work on together. If you’re not a part of the Google group we have set up, let me know and I’ll send you an invite (that goes for every blogger who’s reading this).

  • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

    For teh record, the Google Group mentioned a few times in the comments is here: http://www.japansoc.org

    • yohan

      How many times you want to promote you own Japaansoc Nick? Give it a rest

    • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

      If you click the link, you’ll see that’s not my site.

  • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

    For teh record, the Google Group mentioned a few times in the comments is here: http://www.japansoc.org

    • yohan

      How many times you want to promote you own Japaansoc Nick? Give it a rest

    • http://blog.japansoc.com Nick Ramsay

      If you click the link, you’ll see that’s not my site.

  • http://jdramawatch.com Skillster

    Great Post Yonasu.
    Some excellent ideas, as per usual!
    I like how you have got everyone talking, this is an excellent raft of ideas that are going through here.
    Look forward to more developments on the guest blogging and possibly team blogging (authors from other jblogs team together with several other sites).

  • http://jdramawatch.com Skillster

    Great Post Yonasu.
    Some excellent ideas, as per usual!
    I like how you have got everyone talking, this is an excellent raft of ideas that are going through here.
    Look forward to more developments on the guest blogging and possibly team blogging (authors from other jblogs team together with several other sites).

  • http://jasoncollin.org Jason

    I think one way would be for a person or a group of people to do Google searches, etc. for all and any sites/blogs related to Japan. That person (or those people) would directly contact all those sites/blogs and get them listed in one place and encourage the sites/blogs to get on Twitter and JapanSoc.

    JapanSoc is a very well-designed site, but it suffers from having only like 15 regular users and contributors. So as it exists now the site is very inbred, for lack of a better term. It’s mostly people submitting their own posts (not that I’m not guilty of that myself). Perhaps JapanSoc should require users to submit at least one story not from their own site for every two submissions they make of their own site.

    J-blogging needs to be a lot less about strange Kit Kats and babes in bikinis and more real insider info that people both outside of and inside of Japan can find informative and useful in my opinion. Those kinds of things are fine, but I feel the overwhelm other content.

  • http://jasoncollin.org Jason

    I think one way would be for a person or a group of people to do Google searches, etc. for all and any sites/blogs related to Japan. That person (or those people) would directly contact all those sites/blogs and get them listed in one place and encourage the sites/blogs to get on Twitter and JapanSoc.

    JapanSoc is a very well-designed site, but it suffers from having only like 15 regular users and contributors. So as it exists now the site is very inbred, for lack of a better term. It’s mostly people submitting their own posts (not that I’m not guilty of that myself). Perhaps JapanSoc should require users to submit at least one story not from their own site for every two submissions they make of their own site.

    J-blogging needs to be a lot less about strange Kit Kats and babes in bikinis and more real insider info that people both outside of and inside of Japan can find informative and useful in my opinion. Those kinds of things are fine, but I feel the overwhelm other content.

  • http://madtokyo.wordpress.com john turningpin

    >It is unfortunate that there does seem to be a large number of J-bloggers out there who haven’t joined the collective yet.

    I think some of us are just happier out on the fringes doing our own thing. I’ve posted at 7:10 to Tokyo a couple times, did a guest post on another blog once and thoroughly enjoyed it, but I’m not in it for monetization and I’m not really that big on “the collective.” More to the point, I think the collective wouldn’t be that big on me.

    I’ve met a surprising number of fellow bloggers that have since turned into genuine IRL friends, but I think some of us are a bit too spazzy and/or foul-mouthed for the collective. Or maybe it’s just me.

  • http://madtokyo.wordpress.com john turningpin

    >It is unfortunate that there does seem to be a large number of J-bloggers out there who haven’t joined the collective yet.

    I think some of us are just happier out on the fringes doing our own thing. I’ve posted at 7:10 to Tokyo a couple times, did a guest post on another blog once and thoroughly enjoyed it, but I’m not in it for monetization and I’m not really that big on “the collective.” More to the point, I think the collective wouldn’t be that big on me.

    I’ve met a surprising number of fellow bloggers that have since turned into genuine IRL friends, but I think some of us are a bit too spazzy and/or foul-mouthed for the collective. Or maybe it’s just me.

  • http://tune-in-tokyo.com Billy

    I’m glad I found this post via Japansoc. I am very new to the blogging scene and still pretty green to it all. From a newbie’s perspective I must say that the j-blogging community is overwhelming. There’s just so much out there. Anyhow, I’m looking forward to getting to know you guys and I hope that I can contribute to the group in some way. – Billy

  • http://tune-in-tokyo.com Billy

    I’m glad I found this post via Japansoc. I am very new to the blogging scene and still pretty green to it all. From a newbie’s perspective I must say that the j-blogging community is overwhelming. There’s just so much out there. Anyhow, I’m looking forward to getting to know you guys and I hope that I can contribute to the group in some way. – Billy

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